Around 1905 on a farm in Tumbleton, a rural southeast Alabama town, a young mulatto girl lived a life sheltered by her Negro father and secretly by her white mother who was a wealthy plantation owner's daughter. However, unseen evils were operating in the dark to destroy the awkward “normalcy” between coloreds and white folk that had developed over the span of several decades.  Inadvertently, as a result of the plantation owner's death, the role of the young girl's father became essential.  With the approval of her white grandmother, he was now in charge of overseeing and running the plantation. This power-which was unheard of concerning a Negro- combined with the respect afforded him by his former master's daughter and temperance in allowing him to elevate to a position of authority, all collide to create a fuel to ignite local white prejudices. White prejudices that also took the life of Wesley Johnson, a kinsman, during this era of intolerance. This is a true story depicting the erosion of a young woman's belief in the cultural differences that exist in America. Her life outlines the hottest fires that separate us but ends with a family that is tempered and strong.

 

 ©2008 Faye Walker Howell. All rights reserved.

 

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INSPIRED BY ACTUAL EVENTS

FEATURED IN THE TROY MESSENGER

    Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance 
    Freddie & Mella Miles Foundation

    THE WIREGRASS ARCHIVES

    Landmark Park, Dothan, AL.

    Ruth Ingram

    PIONEER MUSEUM, TROY, AL.

    Curtis & Roslyn Grimsley